With a terrible cry the Balrog fell forward, and its shadow plunged down and vanished. But even as it fell it swung its whip, and the thongs lashed and curled about the wizard’s knees, dragging him to the brink. He staggered and fell, grasped vainly at the stone, and slid into the abyss. ‘Fly, you fools!' he cried, and was gone.


sixpenceee:

by artist Isaac Cordal

More information about his art here

For another art piece about the detrimental state of the future


ihavegoneintohiding:

disabilityhistory:

cestrick:

disabilityhistory:

Breaking down barriers: Russian designers present catwalk collections on disabled models at Moscow Fashion Week

Image description: Three photos of disabled models on a catwalk: a little woman in black and white with a fierce pose, two ambulatory models high-fiving as they cross paths, and a white woman in a manual wheelchair wearing a colorful skirt.

People with disabilities, not “disabled people”

But this is incredible!

I don’t know if you’re disabled or not, but I hope you’re not ablesplaining and telling disabled folks how we should describe ourselves…

First of all, in many English speaking countries, “disabled people” is greatly preferred to person-first (ie “people with disabilities”) language and is much more common across the board. In the US, person-first language is more common. But most of the forces pushing for person-first language are social services, educational, and other non-disabled professionals.

Some people with disabilities in the U.S. prefer person-first language. But many other disabled people, including people with more politicized disability identities, greatly prefer “disabled person.”

Here’s a great essay on the matter.

/lecture

Great project. Great info.

isn’t the first girl out of littlebig?

ybee:

there she is

ybee:

there she is

digitallydelicious:

Amiz by Mnoloconic

fer1972:

Inkstinctive II: Illustrations by DZO Olivier

stuff-and-thangs:

king—county:

"I couldn’t put it back together."

stuff-and-thangs:

king—county:

"I couldn’t put it back together."


Necklace strung with human teeth, seen at an exhibit of Headhunters at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California.

Necklace strung with human teeth, seen at an exhibit of Headhunters at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California.